Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Noise, noise, and more noise...

Sep 29 '14

(Source: merzbeard)

Sep 29 '14

jupitterlarsen:

Ross Rhesymolwaith lived on the windy coast of Wales near Portmeirion - http://youtu.be/wy542H8JbZo

Sep 28 '14
Daniel Menche

Daniel Menche

Sep 28 '14
Lounging by Jessica King

Lounging by Jessica King

5 notes Tags: art
Sep 28 '14
Sep 27 '14

Robert Smithson, Partially Buried Wood Shed, (1970)

Partially Buried Woodshed is a non-monument to the process Smithson calls de-architecturization. A dump truck poured earth onto the roof of an old woodshed to the point where its ridge beam cracked. Architecture is the material, and entropy is the instrument.

Sep 27 '14
New York June 1995:  A young girl in a gown was wearing an auto tire over their shoulder like a sash. Using an electric drill mounted with a sanding wheel, GX Jupitter-Larsen was grinding away at this tire for 30 minutes. A third performer was processing the resulting sounds. The smell of rubber filled the small club.  Polite applause followed.

New York June 1995:  A young girl in a gown was wearing an auto tire over their shoulder like a sash. Using an electric drill mounted with a sanding wheel, GX Jupitter-Larsen was grinding away at this tire for 30 minutes. A third performer was processing the resulting sounds. The smell of rubber filled the small club.  Polite applause followed.

Sep 26 '14
Wow. Thank you one & all…!!!

Wow. Thank you one & all…!!!

Sep 26 '14
Sep 25 '14
HELMHOLTZ SOUND SYNTHESIZER.
HELMHOLTZ, HERMANN VON. 1821-1894. Chemnitz: Max Kohl, c.1905. A wood and brass sound synthesizer built by Max Kohl after the design by Hemholtz. 39½ x 29 inch mahogany base with turned feet, fitted with 11 small wooden platforms, each marked with a number and the words “aus” [from] and “ein” [to], 10 of the platforms fitted with tuning forks and accompanying brass Helmholtz resonators, the tallest measuring 18½ high, each pair ranging in size according to their graduating frequencies, 11th platform fitted with 1 large horizontal master tuning fork. All 11 platforms connected together with wire filaments, which are in turn attached to a keyboard fitted with 10 African ivory keys, each numbered and marked with the tones ut [Do, or C] to 4 octaves, mi [E] to 3 octaves, and sol [G] to 3 octaves. Each key is paired with 2 brass knobs, one each on the wooden panel above the key, and one each on the panel below. Opposite end from keyboard fitted with 2 anodes and 2 cathodes, each with accompanying brass knob. The Helmholtz sound synthesizer was the first electric keyboard. Specimens of these are extremely rare, with only one similar but smaller apparatus located in a US institution that we know of. We have not seen another as large or finely made as this one. The synthesizer was used to combine timbres of 10 harmonics to form various vowel sounds. The system is driven by an intermittent current provided by a large horizontal master tuning fork on numbered wood base, and was operated by pressing on the various keys which sent the current to the corresponding electrically driven tuning forks. These forks, fitted with Helmholtz resonators tuned to the same frequency, would then reproduce the desired tone.
Helmholtz invented his resonator to identify the various frequencies of the pure sine wave components of complex sounds containing multiple tones, showing that the different combinations made could reproduce vowel sounds. Max Kohl of Chemnitz is perhaps one of the most famous scientific instrument makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His work was distinguished by its exacting craftsmanship, and high quality materials.

HELMHOLTZ SOUND SYNTHESIZER.

HELMHOLTZ, HERMANN VON. 1821-1894. Chemnitz: Max Kohl, c.1905.
A wood and brass sound synthesizer built by Max Kohl after the design by Hemholtz. 39½ x 29 inch mahogany base with turned feet, fitted with 11 small wooden platforms, each marked with a number and the words “aus” [from] and “ein” [to], 10 of the platforms fitted with tuning forks and accompanying brass Helmholtz resonators, the tallest measuring 18½ high, each pair ranging in size according to their graduating frequencies, 11th platform fitted with 1 large horizontal master tuning fork. All 11 platforms connected together with wire filaments, which are in turn attached to a keyboard fitted with 10 African ivory keys, each numbered and marked with the tones ut [Do, or C] to 4 octaves, mi [E] to 3 octaves, and sol [G] to 3 octaves. Each key is paired with 2 brass knobs, one each on the wooden panel above the key, and one each on the panel below. Opposite end from keyboard fitted with 2 anodes and 2 cathodes, each with accompanying brass knob.

The Helmholtz sound synthesizer was the first electric keyboard. Specimens of these are extremely rare, with only one similar but smaller apparatus located in a US institution that we know of. We have not seen another as large or finely made as this one. The synthesizer was used to combine timbres of 10 harmonics to form various vowel sounds. The system is driven by an intermittent current provided by a large horizontal master tuning fork on numbered wood base, and was operated by pressing on the various keys which sent the current to the corresponding electrically driven tuning forks. These forks, fitted with Helmholtz resonators tuned to the same frequency, would then reproduce the desired tone.

Helmholtz invented his resonator to identify the various frequencies of the pure sine wave components of complex sounds containing multiple tones, showing that the different combinations made could reproduce vowel sounds. Max Kohl of Chemnitz is perhaps one of the most famous scientific instrument makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His work was distinguished by its exacting craftsmanship, and high quality materials.
Sep 25 '14
Nam June Paik, 24-hour happening, June 5, 1965

Nam June Paik, 24-hour happening, June 5, 1965

Sep 24 '14
6 notes Tags: zine
Sep 23 '14
Sep 21 '14
Ace Farren Ford

Ace Farren Ford

Sep 21 '14